Hutchmoot

October 4 - 7 | 2018


Oct
6
1:30 PM13:30

Afternoon Activities

1:30 pm Songwriters' Ring - Clay Clarkson and Matthew Clark will lead the group in a collaborative songwriting session with the intention of completing a song by the end of the gathering. 

1:30 pm There and Backpack Again - If you saw Kevan Chandler's documentary last year, dodged his wheelchair in the hallway, or heard rumors about him getting carried around Europe in a backpack, come and hangout this year as he shares stories from his most recent adventure, backpacking through China.

1:30 pm Poetry Open Mic - Led by poets Chris & Jen Yokel, this is an opportunity for everyone to come and read something of your own, or just to come and listen to others.

1:30 pm Lectio Visio Workshop: Seeing God's Word at Godspeed (Matt Canlis) - Bored with the Bible? Having trouble hearing God's Word? In training Jeremiah to be a prophet, why was God's first question: "What do you see?" Come and learn how to read the Bible visually. Discover why Jesus invited his disciples to "come and see" the Word made flesh. This workshop is especially suited for Quiet-Time drop-outs, or anyone feeling guilty about their devotional life.

3:30 pm Psalms of Play Workshop (Jennifer Trafton) - No writing talent required. Come and have fun playing with words and celebrate the magic of language.

3:30 pm Rabbit Trails: A 4-Panel Comic Workshop - The concept. The setup. The payoff. Comic strips use visual storytelling to create characters, establish plot, and deliver an idea - all within four panels. Join cartoonist Jonny Jimison for a discussion of his webcomic process and a live drawing presentation - then join the fun and build your own comic strip.

3:30 pm The Membership: A Wendell Berry Podcast (John Pattison, Tim Wasem, Jason Hardy) - Join us for the recording of the inaugural episode of a new podcast inspired by the life and work of Kentucky farmer, writer, and activist Wendell Berry. We’ll hear from a variety of artists and practitioners who have been inspired and challenged by Berry’s poetry, fiction, and essays. 

 

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Oct
6
10:00 AM10:00

Session Three

1. Prophetic Imagination in Hip Hop (Mary McCampbell) - This session looks at the ways in which various hip hop artists prophetically challenge their listeners to rethink the false narratives they have inherited. As we explore Chance the Rapper's subversive joy, Lupe Fiasco and Childish Gambino's disquieting satire, and songs of anger and lament from Public Enemy, The Roots, and Kendrick Lamar, we will discuss how hip hop can usher us into a deeper sense of solidarity, lament, and empathy.

2. The Well-Formed Imagination: Opening the Eyes of Your Child’s Heart (Clay Clarkson) - Where does an active imagination come from in a child? Is it just luck of the genetic draw, or do parents have a part to play? This session will explore the home-grown sources of a well-formed imagination in children. We’ll look at what Scripture says about imagination, consider practical models and methods for forming children’s imaginations, and then share stories of our own imaginal family ways and children.

3. Symphonic Apologetics (Mark Meynell) - This session springs from the experience of using piano transcriptions of two symphonies as part of a church outreach in London. Can art at its most ‘abstract’ (which is what a symphony essentially is) actually say anything, and if so, what? With particular reference to Brahms’ 4th and Prokofiev’s 7th symphonies.

4. Transient Beauty: Earthly Works by Eternal Beings (Ned Bustard, Joe Sutphin, John Hendrix, Kyra Hinton) - Why do we spend so much time making things from pigment, ink, paper, and clay? How much value should we put on the creation of works of art? Should the goal of an artist be connection with another person or the potential endurance of the work itself? In a live-projected demonstration, four artists create while exploring these questions. Come explore the mysteries of the incarnate loss that is essential in all earthly works, and ponder its potential for eternal redemption.

5. Voices of Grace: Encouraging Women in Artistic and Christian Community (Helena Sorensen, Jill Phillips, Janna Barber, Thomas McKenzie) - To have a true picture of the Gospel and our Creator, we must embrace a variety of perspectives, and when we impoverish ourselves of women’s voices, we impoverish ourselves not only of our understanding of art and life and the world, but of God himself and Scripture. Both men and women are invited to join this discussion, as we explore the importance of the female voice in art and in the church, as well as offer suggestions on how to best support this often overlooked image of God.

6. The Second Muse: How Songs Become Songs (Drew Miller, Andrew Osenga, Ben Shive, Brown Bannister) - Wendell Berry writes that "there are, it seems, two muses: the Muse of Inspiration, who gives us inarticulate visions and desires, and the Muse of Realization, who returns again and again to say 'It is yet more difficult than you thought." It is easy to romanticize songwriting and record production as a rapturous affair with the Muse of Inspiration, as if an artist's dreams crystallize into a timeless recording with the snap of a finger. The reality is that there is always frustration and disappointment. Often, a great song is less result of inspiration than of obedience. This session will offer a discussion about the presenters confrontations with the Second Muse.

7. Will Beauty Save the World (S. D. Smith, Heidi Johnston) - Dostoevsky’s famous line, “Beauty will save the world" has, in many ways, become a creed among creative Christians, a summary of belief, a validation of vocation, and a call to action. This session will explore the place and value of Beauty (including the Imagination, Storytelling, the Arts) and its relationship to Truth.

8. Adorning the Dark: Thoughts on Community, Calling, and the Mystery of Making (Andrew Peterson) - Writing is a craft that can’t necessarily be taught, but it can be learned. Andrew will talk about some principles of the creative life that are cross disciplinary, and will hopefully lead not merely to better writing, but a better way to pay attention to the lives God has given us.

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Oct
5
3:30 PM15:30

Afternoon Activities

Improvising Reconciliation: Understand, Encounter, and Live out Paul’s letter to Philemon (Stephen & Juliette Trafton) - Improv may seem like it's reserved for an elite group of actors but the truth is we are all improvisers. After all, we improvise life without a script don't we? This fun & interactive workshop led by Juliette Trafton (Broadway performer, improv trained at Upright Citizens Brigade) & Stephen Trafton (Broadway performer, Youth Ministry Director) will invite you to enter into the drama of Philemon in a way that will lead to greater understanding and confidence as an improvisor in God’s great drama of reconciliation.  

Songwriters' Circle - Bring your instrument of choice and pull up a chair. Clay Clarkson and Matthew Clark will lead all comers in a sharing of songs.

Poetry Open-Mic - Led by poets Chris & Jen Yokel, this is an opportunity for everyone to come and read something of your own, or just to come and listen to others.

Shining Isle Q&A - Chris Wall and the Shining Isle team will be on hand to discuss and show off what's coming from the Wingfeather Saga animated film project.

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Oct
5
1:30 PM13:30

Session Two

1. Reports of the Church's Death Have Been Greatly Exaggerated (John Pattison) - Obituaries for the American church often seem like a cottage industry. But John Pattison, co-author of the award-winning book Slow Church, has seen a different, more interesting, more hopeful story unfolding. Drawing from the 90 neighborhoods he has visited over the last four years, John will tell stories of how faith expressions around the country are weaving fabrics of care in their neighborhoods, and why the future of the church is small, slow, local, and surprisingly bright.

2. Resistance and The Narrow Road (Matt Conner, Thomas McKenzie) - The Resistance is something we all feel. Fear. Apathy. Lack of resources. Whatever the term or reason, we all feel the distance between our stated goals (or self) and our present reality. This discussion will provide some biblical understanding and spiritual handles for encountering resistance in all forms and to help bridge that distance.

3. Imagining Our Neighbors as Ourselves: The Arts, Empathy, and the Christian Imagination (Mary McCampbell) - In his 1940 novel, The Power and the Glory, Graham Greene’s whiskey priest concludes that “hate was just a failure of imagination.” Greene suggests us that in order to love, we must be able to effectively imagine the lives of others. We must, however, learn how to imagine both truthfully and compassionately because the imagination can be used both for dehumanization and rehumanization. This session will look at literature, film, photography, and music that provide us with opportunities to expand our imaginations for the sake of loving our neighbors as ourselves. 

4. Finding Rest For The Soul (Curtis Zackery, Matt Canlis) - With so many responsibilities and distractions vying for our attention, too many of us have built unhealthy cycles of rest. As a result, we burn ourselves out, striving and straining against God's intent for our lives. We can only sustain a life of purpose if we really learn to rest. In this session we will discuss how our misaligned view of rest has its roots in an identity that is out of rhythm with God. Taking steps toward understanding Sabbath in the way that God intends can dynamically affect every aspect of our lives. 

5. Working Together: An Art Story (Russ Ramsey) - A look at the power of creative community, as told through the story of the little-known French painter Jean Frederick Bazille, and his friends who together helped launch one of the most influential movements in the history of Art.

6. The Perilous Pilgrimage: How Writing Shapes the Writer (Andrew Peterson, S. D. Smith, Helena Sorensen) - Writing a story is like fighting your way through a dark forest—and you always come out changed on the other side. Three fantasy authors talk about the struggles and joys of storytelling and world building.

7. Bonhoeffer and The Other (John Hendrix) - Dietrich Bonhoeffer was a German theologian, a pastor, and an agent of the resistance against Adolf Hitler. His legacy is often misunderstood, and his name has become a veritable tug of war between conservative and liberal elements of Christianity. But this session will focus on what might be his most enduring challenge to the world—his notion of seeing "the other" inside and outside the walls of the church.

8. Betting on the Dark Horse: The Holy, Hidden Potential of Human Weakness (Rebecca Reynolds, Douglas McKelvey)  - Weakness doesn’t feel comfortable; it feels like failure waiting to happen. Yet as we walk with Jesus, our darkness, doubt, pain, and inability can be used in the battle to birth redemptive things. If your best just isn’t good enough, come hear Douglas McKelvey and Rebecca Reynolds talk about why broken people make the best warriors.



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Oct
5
9:00 AM09:00

Session One

1. The Creative Voice and the Voice of the Creator (Steve Guthrie) - Plato describes creativity as a kind of "spirit possession" in which the Muse robs the artist of her own voice, making her a passive conduit for the god. A Christian artist, of course, will hope that God is working in and through her. But does this mean that her own voice and identity must be silenced in the way Plato describes? This session will draw on the Council of Nicea to develop a much more satisfying and less dehumanizing vision of the relationship between the voice of God and the voice of the artist.

2. On Patience and the Imagination (John Hodges) - Art and music require that we allow works to speak to us in their own ways. Reading the Bible is no different, in fact, it is the model. This session will include dramatic readings from Hamlet, Job, and an in-depth excursion into a movement of Brahms’ famous Requiem to describe how great artists imitate the work of the Holy Spirit, but can only stand in awe of His accomplishments.

3. Reason to Believe: Spiritual Hunger in the Music of Bruce Springsteen (Matt Conner, Andrew Osenga, John Barber, Mark Geil, Chris Yokel) - Few musicians understand humanity better than Bruce Springsteen. Like Guthrie and Dylan before him, Springsteen has spoken for the common man—their fears, their desires, their heritage, their dreams, and especially their spiritual hunger—for a half century. Through discussion and songs performed live by Andrew Osenga, this session will look at how Springsteen's music speaks to our longing for the Promised Land.

4. Pushing the Bus Uphill: Forming a Creative Community (Bill Wolf, Adam Whipple, Janna Barber, Palmer Gregg) - How is it possible to cultivate creative community where you are? The panelists explore their experiences of making it happen. Between them they’ve started songwriter circles, arts journals, an independent publishing company, writers’ groups, collegiate and church-based creative teams, and more. Finding creative community and accountability can be difficult. Come be encouraged, and figure out what a home-based creative group might look like for you.

5. A Hidden Ministry: The Art, Music, and Story of Caregiving (Sally Zaengle, Allen Levi, Mitzi Pierce, Laura Brown, Kevan Chandler) - From their varied perspectives of caring for children, elders, and a sibling, or being cared for, the panelists discuss how the unseen and mundane acts of giving care are beautiful and honoring to God.

6. Balm for Broken People: Why Scenes, Sights, and Sounds Matter (Mark Meynell) - This session will reflect on why the arts are so vital for those battling mental health challenges, with particular reference to the writing of When Darkness Seems My Closest Friend. Whether or not this is your own battle, this topic has wider importance for pastoring and relating to a world that is broken and in pain.

7. Memento Mori: The Morbid Truth About Joyful Work (Jonathan Rogers, Matt McCullough, Chris Slaten) - Facing death and loss will either steal your appetite for pleasure, or stoke your appetite for what Jesus promises. This session will examine the ways in which loss provides context for Jesus’ promises about eternal life—promises that make it possible to enjoy even those things we’re going to lose. The entry point to this conversation will be through art—the ways in which writers and artists have used their work as a way to deny or defeat death. We’ll look at the dangers of this approach to loss and art, but we’ll also celebrate the creative freedom found in Jesus’ defeat of death. Though art will be the way into this conversation, we will be talking about truths that apply to all work.

8. Fools and Dreamers: Vocational Faithfulness for the Creative Misfit (Jennifer Trafton, Lanier Ivester) - What do La La Land, George Eliot’s Middlemarch, and the 19th-century artist and missionary Lilias Trotter have in common? Drawing from a variety of sources but anchored in the life of Trotter (whom John Ruskin believed might have been the greatest painter of her day), this session will explore the tensions and struggles inherent in pursuing a unique vocational obedience that seems senseless to other people, and challenge common assumptions about art and vocation for Christians in general and for women in particular. Which is more important—public influence or hidden faithfulness? How do we define success? What if that journey (whether we want it to or not) brings singleness or childlessness along with it? How can we give ourselves permission, and find the courage, to walk the path God has called us to walk even when it is out of step with those around us—in the culture and sometimes in the church?



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